Wednesday, 29 August 2018

Mermaid Adventure Bag



 I am so excited to finally be able to release the second of my adventure bags today, the Mermaid Adventure Bag.   Unlike the Horse Stable Bag, this adventure bag has been an evolving design as I created it, with much trial and error until I produced the final result you see today.   I knew I wanted to make something mermaid related as they are really 'in' at the moment and I knew I wanted to use the Adventure Bag concept again, but that was as far as I got.   I started off in Hobbycraft buying a load of cotton yarn in various colours I thought would suit an under sea theme and basically took them all home to create something.

I started off early on in the project knowing I wanted the bag to be a seashell shape almost as though the magical underwater world lay inside a seashell.   However, taking the idea from concept to practice was not as easy as it seemed.   I must have tried and frogged at least 10 different seashells before I found a design I was happy with.   I tried round shells, the spiral kind, long shells and the shell I ended up basing the bag on too.   I tried several methods of construction, including working in back loops, Tunisian crochet, increasing only in the centre of rows, but none of them worked how I wanted it to.   However, with perseverance I eventually created the shape the bag is now and once I had that the actual bag was fairly simple to construct.

The outside is made in Lily Sugar n Cream Violet Stripes and the inside is half yellow and a blue variegated yarn to represent the sea and sand within the

little world.    To construct the bag I made 4 seashells in different colours, and then 4 long rectangles which are attached around the edges of the shell to create the sides.   I added some plastic tapestry canvas inside the seashells to allow them to keep their shape when played with.   The bag is made in two halves and these are sewn together at the bottom to create the bag as a whole.    The two parts are held together with snaps around the edges of the seashell and to finish there is a handle made with a kumihimo disk and sewn to the sides.

Once I was happy with the outside of the shell, I needed to turn the inside into a magical world.   I started making some coral and sea kelp using the bright colours I had in the 4ply cottons.   Each piece of coral is basically made off a chain with several stitches in each chain to make it curly, these are then folded up randomly and sewn together to keep their shape.   The Sea Kelp is made in a similar manner, however, instead of twisting it into shapes, the top and bottom are sewn into the water section.   This allows the Sea Kelp to be more than just decorations, they can be used to hold any of the mermaids or sea creatures in so they look they are really swimming through the bag, or perhaps they could get trapped and need help to be rescued.

I also wanted to create a little clam shell with a pearl inside, to echo the seashell world inside the bag.   The shell is created in a similar manner to the bag although on a simpler and much smaller version.  The clam is only partly sewn together so it can open and close and I also made a removable pearl to go inside the clam shell.  If you are giving the bag to smaller children and worry about choking, you may wish to only create the shell without the pearl, or you could sew the pearl in the clam to prevent this.

No underwater world would be complete without sea creatures and so to join the mermaids I made a small turtle and dolphin.  These are the perfect creatures to play with the mermaids or to hide in the Sea Kelp bed, under the coral or they can all try and get to the pearl inside the seashell without it closing on them.   In addition there are three little fish in different colours that are also around to add more fun and play to the Adventure Bag.   The fish are quite small made in the 4ply yarn, so again, if making for younger children they can either be omitted, sewn to the bag or made larger using a larger thread.



I have made use of some sparkly silver thread throughout this bag to try and give a bit of shimmer and sparkle to this magical underwater world and this looks great on the mermaids and other sea creatures, and although it is not essential to the design it really does make it just a little more special.

The patterns for the Mermaid Adventure Bag are now available in my Etsy Store.   For every bundle pattern you purchase you will get 4 pdf files, one for the actual bag, one with the patterns for the coral, sea kelp and clam shell, one for the turtle, dolphin and fish and finally one for the mermaids.   Each pattern contains a list of materials required to make this bag as well as step by step instructions to help guide you through the patterns.   To celebrate the release of the Mermaid Adventure Bag I am offering a discount of 25% off the price of the patterns until midnight 04/09/18 using the code MERMAID so be sure to take advantage of this offer as it won't come around again.

I hope that you have enjoyed the release of the Mermaid Adventure Bag and if you do make this please feel free to post the pictures of your finished Bag on my social Media Channels.

See you next week with more nautical themed crochet.

Vicky x

Wednesday, 22 August 2018

Maisie the Mermaid



 Mermaids are really in at the moment.    They are a great fantasy creature and loads of little girls (and big ones) love them, so it seemed an appropriate subject for my next Adventure Bag.   I initially knew I wanted something underwater that contained mermaids and a couple of other creatures for them to play with,  but unlike the Horse Stable Adventure Bag I didn't really have a clear plan at the start, it just sort of evolved as I made it.   I basically grabbed a load of really bright under sea looking colours to make this bag, making sure there was some blue and yellow so there could be water and sand, plus some green, grey, jade, red and pink which all looked great.

I actually made the bag first, but I shall talk more about that next week.   After making the bag and the coral decorations, I started on the mermaids.    I worked up a few different styles of mermaid before I settled on the final design.   I played around with a plain single crochet tail, a shell stitch tail and also a crocodile stitch tail, but in the end the shell stitch tail was the one that looked the best.    Her top too, took a few tries to get it looking right.   After a load of playing around I settled on the final design and ended up working 3 of the mermaids in assorted colours.





Maisie the Mermaid is made in 4ply cotton and the colours really do shine making her look like some kind of magical underwater creature.  Maisie's head and hair is actually the same pattern as my horse riding doll, Bella, but just different colours.    I also worked up Maisie the Mermaid in a larger version using Aldi's Baby Blanket yarn and she is a much better size for cuddling up to.   I didn't have an appropriate skin colour in the blanket yarn so her skin is a little washed out in white, but I guess she doesn't come up to the surface too much!   The Larger Maisie was worked in a 6mm hook and measures 15" long and 4" wide.   I also learnt from the failed hair attempt on my crochet horse not to make her hair in blanket yarn, so instead I used some green chunky yarn I had left over from another project.

Maisie the Mermaid is made with join as you go arms and they are then worked in one piece from head to tail, with the flippers added at the end.   Their eyes are sewn on, although if you have some small 3mm eyes they would work well too.   Whilst the mermaids are designed to go in the Mermaid Adventure bag, they do work well on their own too, therefore I have listed the pattern separately incase you just wanted to make the mermaids, and like my larger mermaid you can adjust her size by changing hooks and yarn.

In advance of the release of the Mermaid Adventure Bag next week I am giving away the mermaid pattern for FREE for one week only.   You can download the Maisie the Mermaid Pattern here.   At the end of the week it will no longer be available for FREE and you can either purchase it on its own or as part of the Mermaid Adventure Bag patterns.

I hope that you have enjoyed meeting my mermaids this week and will join me next week for the release of the Mermaid Adventure Bag.   See you then,

Vicky x

Wednesday, 15 August 2018

Crochet Raffia Sun Hat

 

This week I would like to share with you my very unplanned Sun Hat.    I didn't set out to make a sun hat out of Raffia, I actually had made one this year out of regular yarn, and whilst it did protect me from the sun, it also made my head over heat a lot!   I happened to have some raffia in packs of 3 colours, light pink, magenta and lilac and each pack had 30 meters of each colour.   I had no idea how much you would need to create anything so I had bought 8 packs and as it turns out that's enough to make around 6 hats!

I had finished all my currently projects and decided to play around with the Raffia and see how it would crochet up.   I tried a few different crochet hooks to see how it worked up and the easiest to use by far was the 10mm so I stuck with that.   I started crocheting in the round and it worked up really quickly and so I decided to continue with it and so started forming a sunhat.   I figured the larger holes from the 10mm  would make it nice and light and not overheat my head when worn, although I did worry about them being a bit too large and letting too much sun thorough, I decided to tackle this issue when the hat was finished.

I only actually needed 7 increase rounds and then 6 rounds extra to make the right sized hat.  I didn't want too large a brim to I only worked an additional 3 rounds once the hat was hat shaped.   It worked up very quickly on the 10mm and in only an hour or so I had a hat, although at this point I realised it was too big for me as well as the larger holes I mentioned earlier.    It then occurred to me that I could use surface slip stitch around the hole hat which would fill in the larger gaps and make them smaller.   Slip stitch also had a tightening effect and this worked perfectly to combat both of the problems I had.   If you haven't used surface slip stitch before, I encourage you to try it, it can really transform a piece of work.   I had used it as decoration on my Seashell Bags and this time I was using it in a more practical way.   It closed up the larger holes perfectly leaving enough of a gap to allow air flow but not to burn my head and it also bought the hat back to the perfect size for my head and as an added bonus gave a different decorative look to that hat too.

Once I had finished making the hat, I knew it needed something more to transform it from a lilac hat into something that looked much nicer.   I decided

to create a band in the two contrasting pink colours using my kumihimo disk and 4 strands of each colour.   This was probably the part of the hat that took the longest to make in the end, but once completed, I tied it around the hat in a double knot and a bow leaving the bow strands separate and this really finished the hat off.   I decided not to attach the band but leave it loose, so if I choose I can wear the hat plain, or make a different colour band for a completely different look.

With the really hot weather we have had in the UK this summer I have had plenty of opportunity to test it and I am pleased to say it worked great.   I

never once felt like the sun was burning my head and I also never felt like my head was overheating so the Crochet Raffia Sun Hat has definitly fulfilled its requirements as well as looking great.   As a result Raffia will now be my go to material for all the Sun hats I make and it has also made me want to experiment with it more to see what else Raffia can be used for.

If you want to create your own Raffia Sun Hat then you can get the pattern for FREE below.   You just need a small amount of Raffia and a couple of hours and you will have your own Sun Hat too to decorate in anyway you choose.

Join me next week when we return to the undersea theme and I introduce to you the Mermaids that swim in the Mermaid Adventure Bag.   See you next week,

Vicky x

Raffia Sun Hat

 1.  Materials and Resources

Below is a list of everything you will need to make this hat

·        120m Raffia in main colour (I used lilac)

·        About 2m of Raffia in 2 contrasting colours (I used dark and light pink)

·        10mm hook

·        Tapestry needle

·        Scissors

·        Stitch marker

  

2.   Stitch List

Below is a list of all the stitches (and their abbreviations) featured in this series of patterns.  All terms used are American.

·        Sc – single crochet

·        Ch – chain

·        Sc inc – sc increase

·        m/c – magic circle

·        sl st – slip stitch

  

3.  Notes

Here are a few handy tips to help you with the pattern.

·        The gauge for this pattern is 8 sc and 6 rows in a 10cm/4” square.

·        The finished hat diameter is 8” wide (the bit that goes on your head) and 4” tall and will fit a head up to around 24” round. 

·        The hat is worked loosely and then surface sl st is used to fill out the holes a little so they are not so large.   This also makes the hat slightly smaller, so don’t be alarmed if the hat is too big when it is made initially.

·        If you wish to make the hat bigger or smaller then add or subtract an increase round.

·        I used a Kumihimo disk and 8 strands to create the band around the edge of the hat.  This is not attached so can be removed and changed if required.  

 

4.  Pattern

Hat – work in Main Colour

Row

Instruction

Stitches

1

6 sc in m/c

6

2

(sc inc) x 6

12

3

(sc, sc inc) x 6

18

4

(2 sc, sc inc) x 6

24

5

(3 sc, sc inc) x 6

30

6

(4 sc, sc inc) x 6

36

7

(5 sc, sc inc) x 6

42

8-13

sc around

42

14

(sc, sc inc) x 14

56

15

(2 sc, sc inc) x 14

70

16

Sl st around

70

 

Cast off and sew in ends

 

 

Hat sl st – work in Main Colour

Row

Instruction

Stitches

1

Attach yarn in any st from round 1 and surface sl st through each stitch around the entire hat.

616

 

Cast off when finished and sew in ends.

 

 

·        To make band cut approx 50 cm strips of raffia in contrasting colours and either plait or use a kumihimo disk to make the band.

·        Tie the finished band around the hat in a bow and trim ends.

 

© All patterns on this page belong to www.cosycrochet.co.uk You may not sell this pattern. Please feel free to sell the items you make using this pattern, however please acknowledge me in your listing.

 

 


Wednesday, 8 August 2018

Crochet Seashell Bag

 

A while back I set out to make a mermaid Seashell Adventure Bag (coming to the blog later this month) and whilst I was making that bag, I played around with a couple of different cottons and designs.   I ended up making the adventure bag in Lily Sugar n Cream cotton leaving me with 2 spare  Caron Cotton Cakes.   I already had one seashell motive made up when I decided not to use it for the adventure bag, so I decided to use the rest of the cotton to make a normal bag and so I ended up creating the Crochet Seashell Bag.

The bag itself is made with 2 seashell motives which are made in two parts which are sewn together.   They also make use of surface slip stitch to add decoration to the seashells.    The bag side is made in one piece and crocheted to the seashell panels which are finished off with a decorative shell stitch edge.   The edging also adds the D rings for the bag strap which is crocheted and added last.   I decided to add a lining to this bag and wanted it to retain its shape more easily so I used some Bosal in R form which is sewn into the lining before the lining is added to the bag.

I experimented with different bag fastenings before finally settling on using a button and ribbon.   I considered adding a zip but I didn't have one at home that was the right colour and size and sewing in zips is one of my least favourite things to do, so I looked for other options.   I have some snaps at home that were the perfect colour, however, I really struggled adding them due to the thickness of the Bosal, so after several failed attempts I abandoned that idea.   The other issues with the snaps was that they really restricted what the bag could hold when they were done up, and this issue was the same with magnetic bag clasps.   The bag is an awkward shape anyway for holding things and I didn't feel it needed to be any more restricted by its closing.   In the end I settled on sewing a loop of ribbon into the center of the lining which loops around a button sewn on the opposite side of the bag.   This option has worked the best and I love the fact that I had coordinating ribbon and buttons at home already which looked perfect with the bag.



I used my sewing machine for the sewing of the lining and I am glad I did.   Anyone who has been reading my blog for a while will know I am not a fan of hand sewing.   The sewing machine really did it all much quicker and neater than I could and I am glad I bothered to get it out.   In fact I was so happy with the use of the sewing machine and my crochet bag (I was scared to use it before incase the machine ruined the crochet) that I think I will be incorporating more sewing linings into my work in future.   I already have an idea for a Christmas Adventure Bag with a sewn inside which will be coming to the blog this autumn.

Seashells and mermaids are very in at the moment and this perfect little Crochet Seashell Bag will fit right in.   Its not huge at 30 cm long (at the longest part) and 20 cm tall, but it will fit a purse, phone, keys and a few other small items, so it would be perfect for a night out, or just to go out for a little while.   However, as I love experimenting with working up the same patterns with yarns of different thickness I decided to work up a larger bag using Aldi's Chunky Yarn.   The bag worked up much larger at 35cm tall, 60cm wide (at the top) and 20cm deep and is the perfect sized beach bag to carry everything you will need for any beach trip.

There are some slight differences in the way I worked up the larger seashell bag.   I changed the way the handles were made, this is not the sort of bag for a longer cross over body strap, instead I used eyelets and my kumihimo disk to create a rope which I threaded through the eyelets and knotted the ends.   This bag fastens with a magnetic bag clasp, which doesn't get in the way of space like it would have in the smaller bag.    I changed the final edging to a simpler slip stitch round rather than the shells, partly as I ran out of yarn and partly because it didn't need such a decorative edge on a larger bag.   Finally I also added a pocket on the inside when making the lining for all those smaller items you might need.   I really love the larger bag and it will be great for trips to the park and beach with the kids.

If you want to make your own Crochet Seashell Bag then you can get the pattern's for both the small and large for FREE here.  I hope you enjoyed this week blog post.   See you next week,

Vicky x

Small Seashell Handbag


1.  Materials and Resources

Below is a list of everything you will need to make this bag

·        Caron Cotton Cakes x 2 – in Calico Flowers (49003)

·        5mm hook

·        Bosal in R Form or bag wadding/foam

·        1 fat quarter in colour of your choice

·        Large Button & small amount of ribbon

·        2 x D rings

·        Tapestry needle

·        Scissors

 

2.   Stitch List

Below is a list of all the stitches (and their abbreviations) featured in this pattern.  All terms used are American.

·        Sc – single crochet

·        Ch – chain

·        Sc inc – sc increase

·        Sc dec – sc decrease

·        Hdc – half double crochet

·        m/c – magic circle

·        sl st – slip stitch

·        surface sl st – surface slip stitch

  

3.  Notes

Here are a few handy tips to help you with the pattern.

·        Gauge is 20 stitches by 23 rows in a 4” square.

·        The bag is made and crocheted together before the lining is added.  

·        It’s helpful although not essential to have a sewing machine to sew in the lining.  It made it much quicker and neater than I could do by hand, although you can hand sew if preferred.

·        You do not have to make the bag hand 200 rows long, stop when it is long enough for you.

  

4.  Pattern

Seashell side – make 2

Row

Instruction

Stitches

1

5 sc in m/c, turn, ch 1

5

2-3

Sc across, turn, ch 1

5

4

(sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

10

5-6

Sc across, turn, ch 1

10

7

(sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

15

8-9

Sc across, turn, ch 1

15

10

(2 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

20

11-12

Sc across, turn, ch 1

20

13

(3 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, Ch 1

25

14-15

Sc across, turn, ch 1

25

16

(4 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

30

17-18

Sc across, turn, ch 1

30

19

(5 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

35

20-21

Sc across

35

22

(6 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

40

23-24

Sc across, turn, ch 1

40

25

(7 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

45

26-27

Sc across, turn, ch 1

45

28

(8 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

50

29-30

Sc across, turn, ch 1

50

31

(9 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

55

32-33

Sc across, turn, ch 1

55

34

(10 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

60

35-36

Sc across, turn, ch 1

60

37

Use surface sl st to make diagonal lines across the front of the shell, place each sl st across 2 rows of the shell.

 

 

Seashell Base –make 2

Row

Instruction

Stitches

1

Ch 26, sk 1st ch and then sc in each ch to end, turn ch 1

25

2-8

Sc across, turn, ch 1

25

9

Sc around the edges of the rectangle putting 3 sc in each corner, cast off leaving a long tail and sew to the base of the shell.

 

 

Bag Side– make 1

Row

Instruction

Stitches

1

Ch 16, sk 1st st and sc in each st to end of ch

15

2

Turn, sc across

15

3-100

Rep row 2

 

 

·        Holding wrong sides together, sc the side panel around the edge of the first seashell panel leaving the longest edge at the top unattached.

·        Repeat as above to add the second seashell panel to the bag

Bag edging

Row

Instruction

Stitches

1

Thread both D rings on to the working yarn and attach yarn on the right hand side of either of the side panels and work as follows;

 

2

10 sc turn

 

3

5 sc, turn

 

4

5 sc, turn

 

5

5 sc, turn

 

6

Pull the D ring up and over the little piece you just made, then you need to fold it down to contain the D ring and place a sc through each stitch on the top of the rectangle and match to the 3rd loop on the back of the edge from the start of row 1.  Repeat this 5 times in total to secure the piece in a loop containing the D ring

 

7

5 sc to get to the end of the edge piece of the bag

 

8

Then working all the way along the edge of the shell, (5hdc in same st, sk st, sc, sk st) rep to end of shell top

 

9-15

Rep steps 2-8 on the opposite side of the bag.   Sl st to starting st and cast off.   Sew in all ends.

 

 

Bag Strap– make 1

Row

Instruction

Stitches

1

Ch 6, sk 1st st and sc in each st to end of ch

5

2

Turn, sc across

5

3-200

Rep row 2

 

 

Loop 1 end over the D ring and sew the end to the rest of the strap.   Repeat with the other loop.

 

 

To make the lining

1.     Cut out 2 seashell pieces 1 bag side piece, slightly bigger than the bag, in both the lining material and the bosal in R form, leave at least an additional inch of the fat quarter top edge for a seam allowance.

2.     Pin the lining and the bosal in R form together so the right sides face each other and sew together leaving the top edge unworked.

3.     Turn the lining in the right way (so the material is facing inwards) a and place inside the bag.

4.     Fold the additional inch of the lining material over the bosal in R form and pin to the bag.  

5.     Fold a small length of ribbon (large enough to go around the button you choose, plus an additional inch for sewing) in half and put the ends underneath the lining in the middle of one side of the bag and pin in place

6.     Sew the lining and the ribbon into the bag.

7.     Sew the button on the opposite side of the bag to the ribbon.  The ribbon can slip over the button to secure the bag shut. 


Large Seashell Handbag


1.  Materials and Resources

Below is a list of everything you will need to make this bag

·        1200g Super Chunky Yarn in colours of your choice (I used Aldi Chunky in Navy, Storm and Platinum)

·        10mm hook

·        1m2 of Bosal in R Form or bag wadding/foam

·        1m2 of cotton fabric in colour of your choice

·        1 x magnetic bag clasp

·        4 x 1” wide eyelets

·        Tapestry needle

·        Scissors

2.   Stitch List

Below is a list of all the stitches (and their abbreviations) featured in this pattern.  All terms used are American.

·        Sc – single crochet

·        Ch – chain

·        Sc inc – sc increase

·        Sc dec – sc decrease

·        Hdc – half double crochet

·        m/c – magic circle

·        sl st – slip stitch

·        surface sl st – surface slip stitch

 

 3.  Notes

Here are a few handy tips to help you with the pattern.

·        Gauge is 10 stitches by 10 rows in a 4” square.

·        The bag is made and crocheted together before the lining is added.  

·        It’s helpful although not essential to have a sewing machine to sew in the lining.  It made it much quicker and neater than I could do by hand, although you can hand sew if preferred.

·        The handles were made using a Kumihimo disk, however if you do not have one, you could plait several strands of yarn to the desired length or use some rope.

  

4.  Pattern

Seashell side – make 2 in your colour choices

Row

Instruction

Stitches

1

5 sc in m/c, turn, ch 1

5

2-3

Sc across, turn, ch 1

5

4

(sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

10

5-6

Sc across, turn, ch 1

10

7

(sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

15

8-9

Sc across, turn, ch 1

15

10

(2 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

20

11-12

Sc across, turn, ch 1

20

13

(3 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, Ch 1

25

14-15

Sc across, turn, ch 1

25

16

(4 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

30

17-18

Sc across, turn, ch 1

30

19

(5 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

35

20-21

Sc across

35

22

(6 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

40

23-24

Sc across, turn, ch 1

40

25

(7 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

45

26-27

Sc across, turn, ch 1

45

28

(8 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

50

29-30

Sc across, turn, ch 1

50

31

(9 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

55

32-33

Sc across, turn, ch 1

55

34

(10 sc, sc inc) x 5, turn, ch 1

60

35

19 sc, ch 1, sk 1, 20 sc, ch 1, sk 1, 19 sc

58

36

19 sc, sc in ch 1 gap, 20 sc, sc in ch 1 gap, 19 sc

60

37

Use surface sl st to make diagonal lines across the front of the shell, place each sl st across 2 rows of the shell.

 

 

Seashell Base –make 2

Row

Instruction

Stitches

1

Ch 26, sk 1st ch and then sc in each ch to end, turn ch 1

25

2-8

Sc across, turn, ch 1

25

9

Sc around the edges of the rectangle putting 3 sc in each corner, cast off leaving a long tail and sew to the base of the shell.

 

 

Bag Side– make 1

Row

Instruction

Stitches

1

Ch 16, sk 1st st and sc in each st to end of ch

15

2

Turn, sc across

15

3-

Rep row 2 until piece measures 28” long

 

 

·        Holding wrong sides together, sc the side panel around the edge of the first seashell panel leaving the longest edge at the top unattached.

·        Repeat as above to add the second seashell panel to the bag

Bag edging

Row

Instruction

Stitches

1

Attach yarn at any point and sl st around the top edge.

 

 

 To make the lining & handles

1.     Cut out 2 seashell pieces 1 bag side piece, slightly bigger than the bag, in both the lining material and the bosal in R form, leave at least an additional inch of the fat quarter top edge for a seam allowance.

2.     Pin the lining and the bosal in R form together so the right sides face each other and sew together leaving the top edge unworked.

3.     Turn the lining in the right way (so the material is facing inwards) a and place inside the bag.

4.     Fold the additional inch of the lining material over the bosal in R form and pin to the bag.  

5.     Attach the magnetic bag clasp to the lining before sewing the lining to the bag.

6.     Sew the lining to the bag at the top.

7.     Attach the eyelets through the holes made in row 35 of the seashell panels.

8.     To make the handles, I used a Kumihimo disk and some chunky pink yarn I had.   I used 8 strands to make the handles, threaded them through the eyelets and secured with a knot.  

  

  

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